Marketing Meeting :)

I had an excellent meeting with Snow Leopard Publishing’s marketing manager, Christian Lee today for

That English Lady!design (2)

Looking forward to receiving the marketing and production plan as a result.

I’m still excited to continue the, so far interesting, fun, and pleasant journey!

minion happy

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Publishing Contract!!

I’ll make this short and to the point, as I feel it deserves blurting out…

I’ve signed with Snow Leopard Publishing for

That English Lady!

th3TYUJRRR

The fact that they liked my submitted manuscript blew me away. To then go ahead and want to publish it… well, let’s just say…

I’m STOKED!

I’m excited to begin the journey!thTBKDUVGS

thFH2WROS6

HAPPY PLACE!

th

minion happy

Deep P.O.V. Part Two—Crawling Inside Your Characters

Part two of Kristen Lamb’s fabulous advice on DEEP POV.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

This GORGEOUS image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of Aimannesse Photography This GORGEOUS image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of Aimannesse Photography

Last time we talked about the history and evolution of POV (Point of View) and why certain types of POV might not be the best choice for a modern reader. We also talked about what is often called “deep POV” which, until I looked it up one day? I thought was just tight writing. Who knew it had a name?

Today we’re going to dive deeper into deep POV.

Wow, deep.

Yes, there are style changes we can make, like removing as many tags as we can and ditching extraneous sensing and thinking words. But deep POV is strongly tethered to characterization. Good characterization. Before we get to that, let’s talk about what we often do when we’re new.

The Fishy Flashback

When we’re new writers, we often don’t understand plotting. We don’t yet have the skill set…

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Simple Can Be Great

We all write differently and we all read differently. There is plenty of room for all styles and all tastes. Thank you to my friend and fellow author, Amy Weaver, for posting this totally relatable blog 🙂

thelongandwritingroad

One minute: “Oh, I love this.”

Next minute: “Ugh… this is utter crap.”

Three minutes later: “Wait, maybe it’s not toobad.”

Six minutes after that: *Crumbles paper and throws it across the room* OR *Delete… Delete… Delete…*

Every single writer I know has had this moment a few hundred thousand times, if not more. It’s exhausting to question every word we write. It can be excruciating. I tend to pace the floor as I talk out loud (or scream) at my characters, while pulling my hair out at the root.

Pace… pace… pace… scream.

Yes, I know if I chill out, not force it, the words will work themselves out, but of course, it takes me going through the screaming and pacing drama to get me to the other side.

pull hair out

Thankfully, I have random days when it seems all the stars are in alignment, and the rays of writerly-love shine upon me, at the

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Keeping the Writing Marriage Inspired

My friend and fellow author, Amy Weaver, has some excellent points here. Some of which I needed to hear today myself. So, I hope by my reblogging of this insightful post, you might be inspired, too 🙂

thelongandwritingroad

As to be expected, whether they’re full of it or lacking in it, writers tweet, facebook, and blog about inspiration often. I know if I were to go back through the posts I’ve written over the years, I’m pretty sure I have one, two, or five on the subject.

Inspiration means everything to a writer. It’s not only what provokes a new story, but it’s also what keeps the passion going for the story we’re in the process of writing or editing.

The last couple of weeks have been a struggle for me. It’s been hard for me to stay focused and inspired with the story I’m currently editing. I know it’s about mindset, about surroundings, about staying in love with the story, about the passion for the characters– all of that. Every single thing affects our inspiration.

It’s normal to get blasé about a story we’ve been writing, working on, editing, changing, fixing…

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Move Along… Crappy Support Not Taken Here

My friend and fellow author, Amy Weaver, has a great point to share.

thelongandwritingroad

A while back, I was talking to someone about something I was struggling with in my writing. This person is not a writer, but I thought that was okay. I figured they would at least listen, and maybe (hopefully), give me an opinion or an encouraging word. I was wrong. Here was the response:

“Well, you have your writer friends for that.”

This perplexes me to no end. Do writers have to only go to writers for help and support?

I was at a writer’s conference this past weekend and it felt so good to be surrounded by people who understand the passion, the struggles, and the love of the written word. The camaraderie was palpable and the support never-ending. Judgment? That word doesn’t exist among this group and I have to think that would be the case for most writer conferences and groups.

Here’s the thing– we (writers) have to…

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